Cat and Dog Vaccinations

Cats and dogs, just like human beings, need to be vaccinated once in a while to boost their immune system and prevent or reduce their chance of getting a particular disease that may be fatal or even lethal. To help you better understand the types of vaccines available for your cat or dog, we have provided a fully detailed and reliable list of the vaccines available for both cats and dogs at this time. Please take your time to carefully scan through the list as each vaccine has different administration times and recommendations. For more information about these vaccines, please speak to your veterinarian.

Table 1: Canine (Dog) Vaccination Guidelines

Vaccine

Initial puppy vaccination (below or equal to 16 weeks of age)

Initial adult vaccination (over 16 weeks of age)

Revaccination Recommendation

Class

Comments

Canine Parvovirus-2
(CPV2; Parenteral)
Begin at 8–9 weeks of age, then every 3–4 weeks until 14–16 weeks of age. Two doses, each 3-4 weeks apart are suggested, but one dose is considered protective Revaccination (booster) at 1 year, and every 3 years after that. Core
Rabies
(Parenteral)
Administer one dose at 3 months of age. Administer a single dose Depending on the Duration of immunity (DOI) of the vaccine, revaccination can occur every year or 3 years Core* *Core where required by law or in areas at high exposure risk
Canine Distemper Virus
(CDV; MLV, parenteral)
Begin at 8–9 weeks of age, then every 3–4 weeks until 14–16 weeks of age. Two doses, each 3-4 weeks apart are recommended but one dose is considered protective Revaccination (booster) at 1 year, then not more often than every 3 years. Core
Canine Adenovirus-2 (CAV-2; MLV, parenteral and CAV-2; MLV, intranasal) Begin at 8–9 weeks of age, then every 3–4 weeks until 14–16 weeks of age. Two doses, each 3-4 weeks apart are recommended, but one dose is considered protective Revaccination (booster) at 1 year, and every 3 years after that. Core Parenteral preferred for enhanced immunity to CAV-1
Canine Adenovirus-1
(CAV-1; MLV and CAV-1; killed Parenteral)
Begin at 8–9 weeks of age, then every 3–4 weeks until 14–16 weeks of age. Two doses, each 3-4 weeks apart are recommended, but one dose is considered protective Revaccination (booster) at 1 year, and every 3 years after that. Core Not Recommended where CAV-2 MLV available
Parainfluenza virus
(CPiV; Parenteral)
Begin at 8–9 weeks of age, then every 3–4 weeks until 14–16 weeks of age. Two doses, each 3-4 weeks apart are recommended but one dose is considered protective Revaccination at 1 year, then annually where CPiV is monovalent or combined with other none-core components. Non-core Intranasal form of CPiV is preferred to the Parenteral form
Parainfluenza virus
(CPiV; Intranasal)
Administer at 3 weeks of age and revaccinate within 3–4 weeks. Two doses, each 3–4 weeks apart Revaccination (booster) at 1 year, then annually. Non-core This product is usually combined with intranasal Bordetella bronchiseptica
Bordetella bronchiseptica
(Intranasal)
Administer a single dose at 3 weeks of age. A second dose is recommended 2–4 weeks after the first for best results. A single dose Annually Non-core This product is usually combined with intranasal CPiV
Borrelia burgdorferi
(Lyme borreliosis, Parenteral)
Initial dose at 12 weeks of age or older after completion of core viral vaccines. Administer a second dose after 2-4 weeks. Two doses, each 2-4 weeks apart Revaccinate prior to tick season each year. Tick season in BC is during spring and early summer Non-core Recommended for use in dogs living in or visiting areas with high tick exposure, or where disease is known to be endemic
Leptospira interrogans
(Parenteral)
Administer Initial dose at 12–16 weeks of age or older after completion of the core viral vaccines. Administer a second dose after 3–4 weeks. Two doses, each 3–4 weeks apart Annually or more often Non-core Vaccination should be restricted for use in dogs that live in subtropical, tropical, and wet environments.
Canine Influenza Virus
(CIV; Parenteral)
Two doses,   each 2–4 weeks apart with initial dose at >6 weeks of age. Two doses,  each 2–4 weeks apart Annually Non-core Consider for at-risk groups of co-housed dogs such as those in kennels, dog shows or day care.

 

Table 2: Feline (Cat) Vaccination Guidelines

Vaccine

Initial kitten vaccination (Below or equal to 16 weeks of age)

Initial adult vaccination (over 16 weeks of age)

Revaccination Recommendation

Class

Comments

Panleukopenia Virus
(FPV; MLV Parenteral, killed non-adjuvanted intranasal, and FPV; killed adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted parenteral
Begin at 8-9 weeks of age. After 3-4 weeks administer a second dose; and a final dose at 16 weeks of age or older. Two doses, each 3–4 weeks apart One dose is given 1 year following the last dose of the initial series of vaccinations; afterwards, continue vaccination every 3 years Core Use of MLV vaccines is not recommended for pregnant cats. Intranasal vaccination may not be as effective as parenteral vaccination.
Feline Herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1; MLV, non adjuvanted, parenteral and FHV-1; intranasal) Begin at 8-9 weeks of age. After 3-4 weeks administer a second dose; and a final dose at 16 weeks of age or older. Two doses, each 3–4 weeks apart One dose is given 1 year following the last dose of the initial series of vaccinations, then vaccinate every 3 years Core This vaccine is usually combined with the FCV vaccine as bivalent products. Intranasal vaccination may lead to respiratory disease signs.
Feline calicivirus(FCV; MLV, non adjuvanted, parenteral and FCV; intranasal) Begin at 8-9 weeks of age. After 3-4 weeks administer a second dose; and a final dose at 16 weeks of age or older. Two doses, each 3–4 weeks apart One dose should be administered 1 year following the last dose of initial vaccinations; and every 3 years after that. Core This vaccine is usually combined with theFHV-1 vaccine as bivalent products. Intranasal vaccination may lead to respiratory disease signs.
Rabies
(non-adjuvanted parenteral)
One dose at 8 weeks of age and a revaccination 1 year after initial vaccination. Two doses, each 12 months apart Annual booster is required Non-core Administer vaccination where required by law or in areas at high exposure risk.
Rabies
(1, 3 and 4 year killed, adjuvanted, parenteral)
One dose at 12 weeks of age and a revaccination 1 year after initial vaccination. Two doses, each 12 months apart Booster as required by local protocols Non-core Administer vaccination where required by law or in areas at high exposure risk.
Feline Leukemia Virus
(FeLV; virus-vectored recombinant, non-adjuvanted, parenteral and FeLV; killed, adjuvanted, parenteral)
Begin with two initial doses at 8 weeks of age. Administer another dose after 3-4 weeks. Two doses, each 3-4 weeks apart one dose should be administered 1 year following the last dose of initial vaccinations; and every 3 years after that. Non-core Only FeLV negative cats should be vaccinated. FeLV testing prior to vaccine administration should be mandatory.
Feline Immunodeficie-ncy Virus
(FIV; killed, adjuvanted, parenteral)
3 required doses: First dose should be at 8 weeks of age, second dose 2-3 weeks after first dose, and third dose 2-3 weeks after second dose. 3 doses, each 2-3 weeks apart One dose should be administered 1 year following the last dose of initial vaccinations; and every year after that. Non-core Not recommended unless mandatory.
Feline Infectious Peritonitis(FIP; MLV, non-adjuvanted, intranasal) A single dose at 16 weeks of age and a second dose 3-4 weeks later. 2 doses, each 3–4 weeks apart Annual booster is recommended Non-core Not recommended unless mandatory.
Chlamydophila felis
(avirulent live, non-adjuvanted, parenteral and killed, adjuvanted, parenteral)
One dose at 9 weeks of age and another 3-4 weeks later. 2 doses, each 3-4 weeks apart Annual revaccination is recommended for cats with constant exposure risk Non-core Vaccination is recommended for cats that live in multiple cat environments where infections with clinical disease have been confirmed. These vaccines may be associated with hypersensitivity.
Bordetella bronchiseptica
(avirulent live, non-adjuvanted, intranasal)
Single dose at 8 weeks of age. A single dose Annual revaccination is recommended for cats with constant exposure risk Non-core Vaccination may be considered in cases where cats are likely to be at specific risk of infection.

 

Definitions:

Adjuvant: A substances that’s added to a vaccine to enhance the body’s immune response to the vaccine

Avirulent: No longer pathogenic

Core: Recommended for all dogs

Intranasal: Taken into the body from the nasal cavity (e.g. nose)

MLV: Modified Live Virus

None-core: Optional

Parenteral: Taken into the body or administered in a manner other than through the digestive tract, as by intravenous or intramuscular injection.

References:

Day, M.J., Horzinek M. and Schultz R.D. (2007). Guidelines for the vaccination of dogs and cats. Journal of Small Animal Practice, 48, 528-541.

Day, M.J., Horzinek M.C. and Schultz R.D. (2010). WSAVA Guidelines for the Vaccination of Dogs and Cats. Journal of Small Animal Practice 51: 1-32. Print.

Horzinek M.C. and Thiry E. (2009). Vaccines and vaccinations: the principles and the polemics. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 11, 530-537.

Ministry of Agriculture.” Ticks and Humans in British Columbia. Web. 8 July 2015. <http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/cropprot/ticksbc.htm>.

Paul, M.A., Carmichael, L.E., Childers, H., Cotter, S., Davidson, A., Ford, R., Hurley, K.F., Roth, J.A., Schultz, R.D., Thacker, E. and Welborn, L. (2006). 2006 AAHA canine vaccine guidelines. Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 42, 80–89.

Richards, J.R., Elston, T.H., Ford, R.B., Gaskell, R.M., Hartmann, K., Hurley, K., Lappin, M.R., Levy, J.R., Rodan, I., Scherk, M., Schultz, R.D. and Sparkes, A.H. (2006). The 2006 American Association of Feline Practitioners Feline Vaccine Advisory Panel Report. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 229, 1405-1441.

Thiry E. and Horzinek M.C. (2007). Vaccination guidelines: a bridge between official requirements and the daily use of vaccines. Revue Scientifique et Technique de l’Office International des Épizooties, 26, 511-517.

 

 

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